Fog…

So I suffer from something we like to call brain “fog” and I have for a while.  It happens to be one of the side effects of at least two of my conditions.  For those of you who are new, welcome.  I started writing as a way to chronicle my journey through hereditary hemochromatosis with porphyria cutanea tarda.  I thought that was going to be it.  Then I added more about Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis, and dealing with autoimmune food reactions, then fibromyalgia and last was going to be Epstein-Barr virus.  Today I had an MRI done and it was not really, well, enjoyable.  It was necessary, which is why I continued to talk to myself throughout the process and breathe deeply.

We are exploring the possibility of a pituitary issue…honestly, I am just trying to live moment to moment so I will cross that bridge when I come to it.  I don’t know many other people with as many conditions as I have, but if you are reading this and it applies to you, please feel free to let me know some mechanisms you use to cope.  I have to stay present.  If I try to commit to things long-term, it actually stresses me out.  On a day to day basis, I do not know how I am going to feel.  Lately, with no warning at all, I have extreme fatigue during the middle of the day.  It comes on with no warning.  I have to drop the negative.  People.  Situations.  Thoughts.  I simply can’t deal.  I make a list.  If I cross one thing off that list that day, great.  If not, I can still do it the next day.  I honestly use it to stay accountable plus remember things.  I don’t like forgetting, but it happens.  Lastly, I hold my dogs.  Animals can be a way to relieve stress…well, for the most part.  They make me happy, and they are fluffy dachshunds.  Win.

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3 thoughts on “Fog…

  1. Staying in the present is a very important one for me – focussing on the task at hand and not worrying about whether I’ll be able to do all the other things I need/want to get through in the coming hours/weeks/years. I try to achieve one thing each day that will allow me to feel I’ve done something useful or valuable. On a good day it might be a small household task or achieving a physiotherapy target. On days when I can’t even get out of bed it might be as small as writing a birthday card or making a shopping list.

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    1. I so agree. One thing seems so important to me too. I feel like even if I have 10 things to do, I’ll get there…slowly, eventually:) It doesn’t matter how long it takes…we are the ones who have stopped to smell the roses.

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